Superior Unified School District #15

Superior District and School News

Active and involved parents are the cornerstone of education, and we want to keep you as informed as possible throughout your children’s time in our schools. We designed our News page to help notify our parents of important district announcements as well as to provide a place to spotlight exceptional students and staff members. Please visit us here often!

Summer Fun

For most teens, summer is a time to hang out with friends, sleep in late, and be independent. Of course, we are all looking forward to the relaxing pace that summer offers, but if we are going to have a successful summer, we need to plan for it.

Here are some ideas to get you started on an eventful summer:

  1. Check out the local YMCA to see what classes might be offered. Besides swimming, the “Y” often offers classes in cooking, arts and crafts, and even self-defense.
  2. Some neighborhood associations offer workshops in a variety of categories.
  3. Volunteer work can be a great outlet; particularly at an animal shelter, nursing homes, churches, homeless shelters, and soup kitchens.
    1. A side benefit to volunteerism is that it promotes self-confidence and responsibility.
    2. Volunteer work looks great on college applications and resumes; especially if your child wants to apply for a scholarship.
  4. What about a part-time job?
    1. Are there internships or small tasks your teen can do at your place of employment?
    2. Consider helping your teen apply to local grocery stores, restaurants, retail stores, local car washes, or pet care facilities.
    3. Your teen can develop a strong work ethic and learn the value of a dollar.

The best approach is always to talk things out together. It is important to note what limitations might exist and to plan accordingly. The only thing worse than having a bored teen in your home is two or more bored teens! Plan ahead!

Summer Safety

Everyone looks forward to summer: the vacations, swimming, and longer days to play. When your children are so busy, it can be easy to forget basic summer safety. Here are some things to remember, to ensure you and your family have the best—and safest—school break yet.

Stay hydrated
Spending a lot of time outdoors in summer is a good way to become dehydrated. While sweating keeps you cool, it also zaps your body’s water supply. When you or your children are thirsty, instead of reaching for a soda or juice box, grab a water bottle. Water will rehydrate your body faster than sugary drinks, leaving you with renewed energy to go and play. Drinking plenty of water each day—especially when spending time outside—will ensure that you and your family stay safe in the summer heat.

Apply (and reapply!) that sunscreen
Make sure to lather up your family with sunscreen at least 30 minutes before heading outside to enjoy the summer days. This gives the lotion time to soak into your skin and start working its protective magic. Make sure that you also reapply the sunscreen after being in the water or exercising. Don’t forget easy to miss areas, such as the back of your neck, ears, and the tops of your feet.

Wear protective clothing
The summer sun can be brutal, especially when you are at the pool or beach. Make sure you wear protective clothing when outdoors. Wearing a long-sleeved shirt made with lightweight fabric can help ensure the sun doesn’t burn sensitive skin. Also wearing a hat with a rim large enough to shade your face, not only prevents sunburn, but also helps to keep you cool.

Take a break from the heat
Summer sun is at its peak between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. Unfortunately, this is also the time most people spend by the water or in summer camp. Teach your family to stay safe in the heat by seeking out shady places to sit and rest, or take a break from the heat altogether and go indoors for a few hours. This will help avoid heat exhaustion, and ensure an enjoyable summer for all.

The Anxious Child

At the end of the school year, many changes may disrupt a child’s typical routine: final exams, special projects instead of typical lessons, removal of familiar classroom decorations, day-time concerts, and field trips. Mix in a little concern for not seeing friends and favorite teachers all summer, plus the uncertainty of what the next year will bring, and you have a recipe for anxiety.

According to The Children’s Center for OCD and Anxiety, all children will experience anxiety. In fact, anxiety is “normal and necessary.” A normal child “meets life’s challenges by temporarily retreating from situations, placing a greater reliance on parents for reassurance, showing reluctance to take chances, and wavering in self-confidence.” Anxiety comes in the form of “worry, apprehension, dread, fear or distress” and may manifest itself physically with complaints of headaches, stomach aches, and sleep disruptions.

The Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) has provided helpful tips to parents and caregivers to help manage a child’s anxiety:

  • Pay attention to your child’s feelings; do not discount those feelings.
  • Stay calm when your child becomes anxious about a situation or event.
  • Recognize and praise small accomplishments.
  • Don’t punish mistakes or lack of progress.
  • Be flexible and try to maintain a normal routine.
  • Modify expectations during stressful periods; however, according to psychologist Lynn Siqueland, PhD, “it is important that you have the same expectations of your anxious child that you would of another child.”
  • Plan for transitions (For example, allow extra time in the morning if getting to school is difficult).

The ADAA states that an anxious child is not a symptom of poor parenting and advises parents to expect added stress and anxiety to typical family-life. You should seek relief by building and utilizing a support network of friends and family for care-giver breaks, and positive reinforcement for your child. If you have questions or concerns as to whether your child’s anxiety is within the realm of “normal,” seek the opinion of a medical practitioner.